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5 Reasons Why We Should Be Growing Our Own Food

5 Reasons Why We Should Be Growing Our Own Food

Herbert Peabody has been busy tending his winter veggies, and over a lovely, warm cup of teapot tea, Herbie and I were talking about growing our own food.
And, I remembered my dear nan. Nan made it to 101 years old, and she grew her own food. She was mobile on her own two feet, she had beautiful skin and perfect teeth, and gentlemen twenty to thirty years her junior thought she was a bit of all right. Nan enjoyed a glass of wine, loved butter and ate everything. And her trick: it was all in moderation. And food and drink were unprocessed and natural.
And this is exactly what we’re hearing about the kind of food we should be eating today. The advice being shared by many articles and studies with regards to nutrition and meal planning is, “We should be eating what our grandmothers ate.” And if I look at Nan, I couldn’t agree more.
Nan grew up on a farm that had a wonderful vegetable patch which she helped tend. She finished school when she was twelve, and armed with the knowledge gained from being out in the veggie patch, she could have won Masterchef and started her own incredible restaurant.
While our grandparents were being taught important survival skills, they were also eating unprocessed and natural food. And the great news is we can too. How? When we grow our own.

Here’s 5 Reasons why we should grow our own food:

1. It’s wonderful!
When we grow our own food, we watch in wonder as the tiny seed sprouts, the seedling adds leaves, then a flower. We can marvel at the bees spreading their pollen and we wait in anticipation as the flower slowly starts to turn into a pod that, in turn, magically grows into something we can eat.

2. We take time
When we grow our own food, we learn that it takes time for food to grow. We understand fruit and veggies need to be nurtured and cared for, and that they don’t just come in a carton or a crinkly plastic bag.

3. We see perfect imperfections
When we grow our own food, we see that imperfect is unique and super cool. A lopsided pumpkin tastes as sweet and delicious as a perfectly formed specimen. It becomes the feature of an Instagram photo, and the number of likes it gets for your post on facebook sky rockets.

4. It’s fun for everyone!
Growing food is super fun for whole family: kids and parents and grandparents. Everyone can become enchanted with the daily changes that the veggie patch provides. We can pat and poke and squeeze all the new things we see because new things are sprouting and growing, every day.

5. We feel proud of what we’re doing
We can all feel a sense of pride when we’ve grown and made something. To pick a tomato or a zucchini and know that we’ve played a part in its formation is super rewarding. To present a carrot that’s been tended to every day by us is wonderfully satisfying. When we figure out how we can play an important role in growing our own fruit and vegetables, we feel a sense of responsibility and achievement. And, everyone wants to help and be involved. Watering, weeding and sorting out pesky snails is satisfying, and it’s fun!

Studies show that children who are involved in growing their own fruit and vegetables are more likely to give them a try at the dinner table. When kids understand how food grows and where it comes from, they are more interested in it, and that’s a big win for the whole family.
The backyard veggie patch is back. It’s a step forward to being sustainable and doing something good for our whole family. And it’s a wonderful way to spend time doing something you love!
So, you might like to ask your grandparents if they had a veggie patch, and what they grew in it. You may even learn a favourite recipe you could cook together. And we’d love to see your creations. Jump on Herbie’s instagram or facebook to share what you’ve been growing and eating!

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